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Saturday, April 2, 2011

Jane Russell sex symbol

Jane Russell (June 21, 1921 – February 28, 2011) was an American film actress and was one of Hollywood's leading sex symbols in the 1940s and 1950s.
Russell moved from the Midwest to California, where she had her first film role in 1943 with The Outlaw. In 1947, Russell delved into music before returning to films. After starring in multiple films in the 1950s, Russell again returned to music while completing several other films in the 1960s. She starred in over 20 films throughout her career.
Russell married three times and adopted three children and, in 1955, founded the World Adoption International Fund. For her achievements in film, she received several accolades including having her hand and foot prints immortalized in the forecourt of Grauman's Chinese Theatre and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
Russell had three husbands: Bob Waterfield, a UCLA All American, Cleveland Rams and Los Angeles Rams quarterback, Los Angeles Rams head coach, and Pro Football Hall of Fame member (married on April 24, 1943, then divorced in July 1968); actor Roger Barrett, (married on August 25, 1968, until his death on November 18, 1968); and the real-estate broker John Calvin Peoples (married January 31, 1974 until his death from heart failure[10] on April 9, 1999). Russell and Peoples lived in Sedona, Arizona for a few years, but spent the majority of their married life residing in Montecito, California. In February 1952, she and Waterfield adopted a baby girl, Tracy. In December 1952, they adopted a fifteen-month-old boy, Thomas, whose birth mother, Hannah McDermott had moved to London to escape poverty in Derry, Northern Ireland, and in 1956 she and Waterfield adopted a nine-month-old boy, Robert John. Due to back street abortions, her first at 18, Russell herself was unable to have children, [11]and in 1955 she founded World Adoption International Fund (WAIF), an organization to place children with adoptive families and which pioneered adoptions from foreign countries by Americans.[12] She described herself as "vigorously pro-life".
At the height of her career, Russell started the "Hollywood Christian Group," a weekly Bible study at her home which was arranged for Christians in the film industry. Russell appeared occasionally on the Praise The Lord program on the Trinity Broadcasting Network, a Christian television channel based in Costa Mesa, California. Russell was, at times, a prominent Republican Party member who attended Dwight Eisenhower's inauguration along with other notables from Hollywood such as Lou Costello, Dick Powell, June Allyson, Anita Louise and Louella Parsons. She has described her struggles with alcoholism, commenting in her later life, "These days I am a teetotal, mean-spirited, right-wing, narrow-minded, conservative Christian bigot, but not a racist."
Russell resided in the Santa Maria Valley along the Central Coast of California. She died at her home in Santa Maria of a respiratory-related illness on February 28, 2011.[15][16] She was survived by her three children: Thomas Waterfield, Tracy Foundas and Robert Waterfield.[2] Her funeral was held on March 12, 2011 at Pacific Christian Church, Santa Maria.

Americanization of Emily

Americanization of Emily is a 1964 American comedy-drama war film directed by Arthur Hiller and written by Paddy Chayefsky, loosely adapted from the novel of the same name by William Bradford Huie.
Set in London in 1944 during World War II, in the weeks leading up to D-Day, the black-and-white film stars James Garner, Julie Andrews and Melvyn Douglas and features James Coburn, Joyce Grenfell and Keenan Wynn. Both Garner and Andrews consider it their personal favorite of their films.
LCDR Charlie Madison (James Garner), USNR, is a cynical and highly efficient adjutant to RADM William Jessup (Melvyn Douglas) in London. Madison's job as a dog robber is to keep his boss and other high-ranking officers supplied with luxury goods and amiable Englishwomen. He falls in love with a driver from the motor pool, Emily Barham (Julie Andrews), who has lost her husband, brother, and father in the war. Madison's sybaritic, "American" lifestyle amid wartime scarcity both fascinates and disgusts Emily, but she does not want to lose another loved one to war and finds the "practicing coward" Madison irresistible.
Under stress since the death of his wife, Jessup obsesses over the Army and its Air Corps overshadowing the Navy in the forthcoming D-Day invasion. The mentally unstable admiral decides that "The first dead man on Omaha Beach must be a sailor." A film will document the death, and the casualty will be buried in a "Tomb of the Unknown Sailor."

Barabbas (1961 film)

Barabbas is a 1961 film expanding on the career of Barabbas, from the Christian Passion narrative in the Gospel of Mark and other gospels. It starred Anthony Quinn as Barabbas, with Silvana Mangano, Katy Jurado, Arthur Kennedy, Harry Andrews, Ernest Borgnine, Vittorio Gassman, and Jack Palance, and was distributed by Columbia Pictures. The film, conceived as a grand Roman epic, was based on the Nobel-Prize winning novel Barabbas (1950) by Pär Lagerkvist. A previous film version of the novel, in Swedish, had been made in 1953.
The film of Lagerkvist's novel was directed by Richard Fleischer and shot in Rome under the supervision of producer Dino De Laurentiis. It included many spectacular scenes, including a battle of gladiators in a Cinecittà mock-up of the Colosseum, and a final crucifixion shot during a real eclipse of the sun.
The music score by Mario Nascimbene contained a stark experimental component—what the composer himself called 'new sounds', in order to demonstrate the eclipse as a supernatural event in the Judean age (see liner notes of CD of original soundtracks of Alexander the Great and Barabbas, music composed, orchestrated and conducted by Mario Nascimbene).
Shortly before the crucifixion of Christ, Pontius Pilate (Arthur Kennedy) offers to release either Jesus Christ or Barabbas in keeping with the local custom. As the Bible story goes, Barabbas is the one the crowd chooses.
Barabbas leaves and returns to his friends. His friends are glad to see him, but Barabbas wants to know where his lover Rachel is (Silvana Mangano). They inform him that Rachel had changed while he was away, and was following the teachings of Christ. Rachel soon returns, but she is not overjoyed to see Barabbas again. During their reunion Christ is crucified. As Christ dies the sky turns dark. Shaken by this, Barabbas goes to witness the crucifixion. Afterwards he goes to witness Christ being sealed in the tomb. On the third morning Barabbas goes to the tomb to find the tomb open, and Christ gone. Rachel tells him that Christ has risen, but Barabbas dismisses this as illusion, or that his followers had taken his body. He goes to see the apostle Peter and Christ's other followers to demand what happened to the body - they do not know where he is but do believe he is risen. Rachel begins to teach others in Jerusalem about Christ and an impending, fiery end of the world. Soon, Rachel's teachings lead to her being stoned to death by the same men who had Jesus crucified. When Barabbas comes across them later while robbing a caravan, he assaults one of the men. For this, Barabbas is arrested by the Roman authorities. Pilate decides not to execute Barabbas, but instead sentences him to a life sentence in the sulfur mines of Sicily.

Beverly Hillbillies

Beverly Hillbillies is an American situation comedy originally broadcast for nine seasons on CBS from 1962 to 1971, starring Buddy Ebsen, Irene Ryan, Donna Douglas and Max Baer Jr.
The series is about a poor backwoods family transplanted to Beverly Hills, California, after striking oil on their land. A Filmways production created by writer Paul Henning, it is the first in a genre of "fish out of water" themed television shows, and was followed by other Henning inspired country-cousin series on CBS. In 1963, Henning introduced "Petticoat Junction" and in 1965 he reversed the rags to riches model for Green Acres. Beverly Hillbilies paved the way for later culture-conflict programs such as McCloud, The Nanny, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, and Doc. Panned by many entertainment critics of its time, it quickly became a huge ratings success for most of its nine-year run on CBS.
The Beverly Hillbillies ranked among the top twelve most watched series on television for seven of its nine seasons, twice ranking as the number one series of the year, with a number of episodes that remain among the most-watched television episodes of all time.
The ongoing popularity of the series spawned a 1993 film remake by 20th Century Fox.
Beverly Hillbillies series starts with the OK Oil Company learning of oil in Jed Clampett's swamp land. Patriarch Jed moves with his family into a mansion next door to his banker (Milburn Drysdale) in the wealthy Los Angeles County city of Beverly Hills, California, where he brings a moral, unsophisticated, and minimalistic lifestyle to the swanky, sometimes self-obsessed and superficial community. The theme song introduces the viewer to the world's most fortunate hunting accident – whereby Jed shoots at game but instead hits "black gold". Double entendres and cultural misconceptions were the core of the sitcom's humor. Frequently, plots involved the outlandish efforts taken by Drysdale to keep the Clampetts in Beverly Hills, and their money in his bank. The family's periodic attempts to return to the mountains were often prompted by Granny due to a perceived slight she received from one of the "city-folk". Beverly Hillbillies accumulated seven Emmy nominations during its run. Nearly a half century since its premiere, the series remains in syndication on several cable networks, including TV Land.
The Hillbillies themselves were Buddy Ebsen as the widowed patriarch Jed "J.D." Clampett; Irene Ryan as his ornery mother-in-law, Daisy May "Granny" Moses; Donna Douglas as his curvaceous, tom-boy daughter Elly May Clampett; and Max Baer Jr as Jethro, the brawny, half-witted son of his cousin Pearl Bodine. Pearl (played by Bea Benaderet) appeared in most of the first season episodes, as did Jethro's twin sister Jethrine, played by Baer in drag, using Linda Kaye Henning's voiceover. Pearl was the relative who prodded Jed to move to California, after being told his modest property could yield $25 million.

Ronald Skirth

John Ronald Skirth (11 December 1897–1977) served in the Royal Garrison Artillery during the First World War. His experiences during the Battle of Messines and the Battle of Passchendaele led him to resolve not to take human life, and for the rest of his army service he made deliberate errors in targeting calculations to try to ensure the guns of his battery missed their aiming point on the first attempt, giving the enemy a chance to evacuate. Many years later, after retiring from a career as a teacher, he wrote a memoir of his years in the army, describing his disillusionment with the conduct of the war and his conversion to pacifism. In 2010 the memoir was published as The Reluctant Tommy.
A self-confessed 'dreamer' with a romantic sensibility, Skirth was very fond of literature, and in particular poetry; he took with him to the Western Front a much-annotated copy of Francis Turner Palgrave's Golden Treasury. His favourite poets were John Keats, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron. He had an intense love of beauty, which he found all around him in music, architecture and the natural world. On the Western Front, he wrote, he was "deprived of the one thing that to me was as precious as life itself, my love of beauty".
Although Skirth had volunteered for the Army in 1915, as an idealistic patriot, convinced that "King and Country" were causes worth fighting for, it was not long before he became disillusioned with the war and the army. He attributed this to a combination of his sensitive character, his Christian upbringing and sense of right and wrong, and, most significantly, the horror of his war experiences.
After the war, Skirth remained a convinced pacifist for the rest of his life. He believed that Britain should not have declared war on Germany in 1939 and claimed that he would rather surrender and face occupation than take up arms against a hostile force. Writing in the early 1970s, he expressed hope that the next generation of political leaders would not make the same mistakes as their forebears.

Dash (spaniel)

Dash  was a King Charles spaniel owned by Queen Victoria. Victoria's biographer Elizabeth Longford called him "the Queen's closest childhood companion", and in the words of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, he "was the first in a long line of beloved little dogs".
He was given to Victoria's mother, the Dowager Duchess of Kent, on 14 January 1833 by Sir John Conroy, the Comptroller of the Duchess's household.By the end of April 1833, he had become Victoria's companion, and by Christmas that year she was doting on him, giving him a set of rubber balls and two pieces of gingerbread as presents. In return, the dog was loyal to Victoria; on one occasion she went sailing in a yacht, and Dash leapt from the coastline into the sea and swam after her.
Victoria, who was 13 when given Dash, had few if any childhood friends as she was raised largely isolated from other children under the so called "Kensington System", an elaborate set of rules and protocols devised by the Duchess and Conroy. The only girl of a similar age with whom she had regular contact was Conroy's youngest daughter, Victoire, but they seemed to have had only a formal acquaintanceship. In her diary, Victoria refers to Victoire as "Miss Conroy" but the dog is showered with endearments: "dear sweet little Dash" and "dear Dashy".
In November 1834, Victoria and her mother took a holiday at St Leonards-on-Sea. They, with Dash, Lady Flora Hastings and Baroness Louise Lehzen, were driving in a landau drawn by two horses when the horses got caught in the traces and fell. With the horses struggling on the ground, there was a danger the carriage would overturn, injuring the women. Victoria scrambled out with Dash in her arms, and, as she recalled, "ran on with him in my arms calling Mama to follow, Lehzen and Lady Flora followed us also." While two passing gentleman cut the horses free, the ladies, and Dash, took shelter behind a wall.
Dash remained with Victoria after her accession as Queen in 1837. Following her coronation on 28 June 1838, Victoria returned to Buckingham Palace and ran up to her rooms to give Dash his usual bath.
Dash died at the end of 1840, and was buried at Adelaide Cottage in Windsor Home Park. A marble effigy was erected over the grave, bearing the inscription.

Here lies
The favourite spaniel of Her Majesty Queen Victoria
In his 10th year
His attachment was without selfishness
His playfulness without malice
His fidelity without deceit
If you would be beloved and die regretted
Profit by the example of

Hendrik Pieter Nicolaas Muller

Hendrik Pieter Nicolaas Muller, GON, RNL, FRGS (2 April 1859 in Rotterdam - 11 August 1941 in The Hague, Netherlands) was a Dutch businessman, diplomat, world traveller, publicist, and philanthropist. He was a son of Hendrik Muller Sz., a Rotterdam-based Dutch businessman and politician, and Marie Cornelie van Rijckevorsel, member of another prominent Rotterdam based business family.
Muller started his career as a businessman, trading with East and West Africa. In his mid-twenties he travelled to Zanzibar, Mozambique, and South Africa for business purposes, but showed himself a keen ethnographer as well, collecting ethnographic artifacts and writing reports about the societies and people he encountered on his way. In 1890, Muller retired from business for personal reasons, and went to Germany to study ethnography and geography. He graduated with a Ph.D. dissertation four years later.
In 1896 he was first appointed consul and later consul general for the Orange Free State. Muller held this position all through the Second Boer War and his high-profiled performance as European representative for this Boer republic won him considerable fame and notoriety, which lasted all his life. After the Treaty of Vereeniging was signed in 1902 Muller retired to a life of travelling and writing for some years, making Muller a household name with his travelbooks. In 1919 the Dutch government appointed him envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to Romania, and later to Czechoslovakia, where he retired in 1932. As diplomat Muller strongly promoted Dutch business interests, especially in oil and electrotechnics.
Muller was a prolific writer. Over the course of his life he published well over two hundred articles, brochures, and books about his travels through the world, about South Africa and the Boers, and about Dutch foreign policy and diplomacy, apart from a range of other subjects. Muller gathered a large fortune with well appointed private investments. He bequeathed his considerable wealth to a private fund in support of academic research and cultural heritage.

Arturo Chávez

Arturo Chávez Chávez (born September 4, 1960) is a Mexican prosecutor who served as Attorney General of Mexico in the cabinet of President Felipe Calderón from 24 September 2009 until 31 March 2011. He previously served as Attorney General of Chihuahua during the governorship of Francisco Barrio.
He has also worked as chief advisor to former Senator Diego Fernández de Cevallos, as Undersecretary of Legal Affairs and Human Rights at the Secretariat of the Interior and as former envoy of the secretariat during the 2006 Oaxaca protests.
His nomination to the post of Attorney General by President Felipe Calderón on 7 September 2009 was received with harsh criticism from some human rights activists and relatives of the victims of the female homicides in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, who, according to William Booth of the Washington Post, claim he did little during his years as Attorney General of the state to solve the killings of hundreds of women in the 1990s.
Chávez was required by law to testify before the Senate before assuming office. According to Ken Ellingwood of the Los Angeles Times, his party held a numerical advantage in the 128-seat legislative chamber but lacked a clear majority, so it needed to reach for votes across the aisle. During the session, Chávez expressed his opposition to the death penalty, though the Ecologist Green Party had strongly campaigned for its implementation—and cannabis legalization, which the Senate as a whole had recently voted to decriminalize in small amounts for personal use. In the end, his nomination was confirmed with 75 votes in favor, 26 against (mostly from the political left), and one abstention. However, his appointment was criticised by the United States in a leaked diplomatic cable as "unexpected and inexplicable".
Chávez resigned on 31 March 2011 after 18 months as Attorney General, citing personal reasons, three weeks after the U.S. cable was made public. President Calderón described Chávez's work in office as having "been fundamental to ... efforts to establish rule of law", and said Chávez was the reason many cartel leaders had now faced justice. Calderón has appointed Marisela Morales, head of the organized crime department in the Office of the General Prosecutor, as Chávez's successor.


Baywatch is an American action drama series about the Los Angeles County Lifeguards who patrol the beaches of Los Angeles County, California starring David Hasselhoff. The show ran from 1990 to 1999 (and 1999-2001 as Baywatch Hawaii). According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Baywatch is the most watched TV show in the world of all time, with over 1.1 billion viewers a week.
Baywatch premiered on NBC in 1989, but was canceled after only one season due to low ratings and also because the studio, GTG, went out of business. Feeling the series still had potential, David Hasselhoff, creators and Executive Producers Michael Berk, Douglas Schwartz and Greg Bonann revived it for the first-run syndication market in 1991. Hasselhoff was given the title of Executive Producer for his work on bringing the show back. The series was hugely successful, especially internationally. The show led to a spin-off: Baywatch Nights, and a reunion movie, Baywatch: Hawaiian Wedding.
In 1999, with production costs rising in Los Angeles, and the syndication market shrinking, the plan was to move the show to Australia and launch Baywatch Down Under. A pilot was filmed but the series was stopped when residents of Avalon put forth strong objections, including potential damage to a fragile ecosystem. Pittwater Council permanently barred all future filming. The pilot finally aired as a two-part episode of Baywatch.
Hawaii offered the producers large financial incentives to move the show to the islands and in Season 10 Baywatch Hawaii was launched.

Types of towels

A bath towel is used for drying the body after bathing,showering or swimming. It is typically rectangular, with a typical size around 30"×60" (75×150 cm). A large bath towel is sometimes called a bath sheet.
A beach towel is usually a little bit larger than a bath towel. Although it is often used for drying off after being in the water, its chief purpose is to provide a surface to lie on. They are also worn for privacy while changing clothes in a public area, and for wiping sand from the body or objects. Beach towels often have colorful patterns.
A foot towel is a small, rectangular towel which, in the absence of a rug, carpet or bathroom mat, is placed on the bathroom floor to stand on after finishing a shower or bath.
A hand towel is significantly smaller than a bath towel (perhaps 30x60 cm), and is used for drying the hands after washing them.
An Oven towel is a multipurpose household towel used for a kitchen or shop applications. The term came into use within Irish communities after a textile mogul, Owen Valley created the line based on his own towel experiences.
The term kitchen towel can refer to either a dish towel or to a paper towel, the latter usage being primarily British.
A paper towel is a piece of paper that can be used once as a towel and then be disposed of. A perforated roll of paper towels is normally mounted on a rod a little longer than the width of the roll, or in an alternative type of hanger that has protrusions on ears, the protrusions fitting into the ends of the paper towel roll. Paper towels can also be found packaged like facial tissues, as individual folded sheets.
A disposable towel (or nonwoven towel) is a towel intended for a single user, but not necessarily for a single use, as it can be reused but not washed. It is often made of non-woven fibers, and popular for the hospital, hotel, geriatric and salon or beauty industries because it guarantees cleanliness and hygiene every time.
A show towel is a subspecies of the common bath or hand towel that has had trim, such as satin, lace or linen stitched onto it, or embroidery done on it, mainly to simply "look nice". They are used to add a decorative touch, usually to a bathroom, most commonly in the USA. They should not be used to actually dry anything, as regular washing ruins the added trim, and the towel buckles as well (because the towel usually shrinks differently than the trim).
A sports towel, or (synthetic) chamois, is a towel used by swimmers and divers. It is a super-absorbent towel that can be wrung out when saturated, leaving the towel able to absorb water again, although not dry.
A sweat towel or gym towel, often of similar size to a hand towel, is used during a workout to dry yourself from sweat and/or make a barrier between the gym machines and your skin, It can also be required in gyms in order to wipe down the machines after use.
A tea towel (English) or dish towel (American) is a cloth which is used to dry dishes, cutlery, etc., after they have been washed. In 18th century England, a tea towel was a special linen drying cloth used by the mistress of the house to dry her precious and expensive china tea things. Servants were considered too ham-fisted to be trusted with such a delicate job, although housemaids were charged with hand-hemming the woven linen when their main duties were completed. Tea towels have been mass-produced since the Industrial Revolution.
A flannel, wash cloth, washcloth, or face cloth is a small square about the width of a hand towel, and is used by wetting, applying soap to the towel, and then using the towel to apply the soap to skin. This increases abrasion, and can remove dead skin cells from the skin more effectively than just manual application and rubbing of soap. In some parts of the world, washing mitts are used for this purpose.
A wet towel (oshibori) is used in Japan to wash the hands before eating. It is often given to customers of an izakaya.
A microfiber towel is a towel made of a specially designed, ultra-tightly woven material, known for its excellent absorption and fast drying speed. These towels can reduce water and electricity consumption by up to 40% over other traditional towels, such as cotton.
A cloth towel dispenser or continuous cloth towel is a towel manipulated by a series of rollers, used as an alternative to paper towels and hand dryers in public washrooms. These may have a lower environmental impact than paper towels, though concerns over hygiene mean they are not used by some organisations. They can also be used in dangerous "choking games".
A sanitary towel or sanitary napkin is an absorbent item worn by a woman while she is menstruating.

Washing machine

Washing machine (laundry machine, clothes washer, or washer) is a machine designed to wash laundry, such as clothing, towels and sheets. The term is mostly applied only to machines that use water as the primary cleaning solution, as opposed to dry cleaning (which uses alternative cleaning fluids, and is performed by specialist businesses) or even ultrasonic cleaners.

To clean clothing it is necessary to rub and flex the cloth to break apart solids and help the soap penetrate. At first this was done by pounding or rubbing the clothing with rocks in a river, and later developed into the corrugated wash board. In Roman times a person would whiten clothing by rubbing it against a rock while letting soap lie on it. The soap was made of animal fat.
Clothes washer technology developed as a way to reduce the drudgery of this scrubbing and rubbing process by providing an open basin or sealed container with paddles or fingers to automatically agitate the clothing. The earliest machines were often hand-operated. As electricity was not commonly available until at least 1930, these early machines were often operated by a low-speed single-cylinder hit and miss gasoline engine.
Because water usually had to be heated on a fire for washing, the warm soapy water was precious and would be reused over and over, first to wash the least soiled clothing, then to wash progressively dirtier clothing. While the earliest machines were constructed from wood, later machines made of metal permitted a fire to burn below the washtub, to keep the water warm throughout the day's washing.
Removal of soap and water from the clothing after washing was originally a separate process. The soaking wet clothing would be formed into a roll and twisted by hand to extract water. To help reduce this labour, the wringer/mangle was developed, which uses two rollers under spring tension to squeeze water out of the clothing. Each piece of clothing would be fed through the wringer separately. The first wringers were hand-operated, but were eventually included as a powered attachment above the washer tub. The wringer would be swung over the wash tub so that extracted wash water would fall back into the tub to be reused for the next wash load.
The modern process of water removal by spinning did not come into use until electric motors were developed. Spinning requires a constant high-speed power source, and was originally done in a separate device known as an extractor. A load of washed clothing would be transferred from the wash tub to the extractor basket, and the water spun out. These early extractors were often dangerous to use since unevenly distributed loads would cause the machine to shake violently. Many efforts have been made to counteract the shaking of unstable loads, first by mounting the spinning basket on a free-floating shock-absorbing frame to absorb minor imbalances, and a bump switch to detect severe movement and stop the machine so that the load can be manually redistributed. Many modern machines are equipped with a sealed ring of liquid that works to counteract any imbalances.
What is now referred to as an automatic washer was at one time referred to as a washer/extractor, which combines the features of these two devices into a single machine, plus the ability to fill and drain water by itself. It is possible to take this a step further, to also merge the automatic washing machine and clothes dryer into a single device, but this is generally uncommon because the drying process tends to use much more energy than using two separate devices; a combined washer/dryer not only must dry the clothing, but also need to dry out the wash chamber itself.
Alliance Laundry (Speed Queen)
Antonio Merloni under the brand names Asko, Ardo, Philco and Servis
Arçelik - including the brand names Beko, Blomberg, Altus and Arctic
Bosch - including the brand names Siemens, Neff, Balay, Profilo and Constructa
Candy - including the brand names Hoover and Zerowatt
Continental Girbau
Dexter Laundry
Dyson (no longer produced)
Electrolux - including the brand names AEG, Frigidaire, John Lewis, Rex, Tricity Bendix, Zanussi and Zoppas
Fagor - including the brand names Brandt, Thompson, Ocean and SanGiorgio
Fisher & Paykel
GE - including (in the United States) the brand name Hotpoint
Godrej (India)
Indesit - including the brand names Hotpoint-Ariston, Creda and Scholtes
Mabe - including the brand names Easy, Centrales, Dako, Moffat
Mueller Eletrodomésticos
Pellerin Milnor
Schulthess - including the brand name Merker
V-Zug - including the brand names Sibir and Gehrig
Videocon (India)
Whirlpool - including the brand names Admiral, Amana, Inglis, Kenmore, Maytag, Magic Chef, Estate, Kirkland and Roper

Role in women's liberation
The historically laborious process of washing clothes has at times been labelled "woman's work" and women from all classes tried to find ways to get relief from doing laundry.
In 2009, L'Osservatore Romano published an article entitled "The Washing Machine and the Liberation of Women" that was controversially meant to demonstrate that the washing machine had done more for the liberation of woman than the contraceptive pill and abortion rights, which are often associated to Women's Day. The article shocked Italian feminists and provoked criticism from Opposition MP Paola Concia. A study from Université de Montréal also presented a similar point of view to that of L'Osservatore.

Teen Mom

Teen Mom is an American reality television series that premiered on MTV on December 8, 2009. The series is a spin-off of 16 and Pregnant, and chronicles the lives of four of the original teenagers from that series as they navigate their first year of motherhood. In addition to teenage motherhood, the series focuses on themes of changing relationships, specifically, those of the family, friends, couples and school. It shows the struggles teenagers have to go through to raise their children.

The series' pilot episode was the highest rated premiere on MTV in over a year with 2.1 million total viewers. This record has since been surpassed by MTV's version of Skins, which had 3.26 million viewers during its first episode. The season one finale brought in 3.6 million viewers. The second season of the show premiered on July 20, 2010. For its second season finale, it pulled in over 5.6 million viewers. A spin-off titled Teen Mom 2 was announced for January 11, 2011.


Conversation is interactive, more-or-less spontaneous, communication between two or more conversants. Interactivity occurs because contributions to a conversation are response reactions to what has previously been said. Spontaneity occurs because a conversation must proceed, to some extent, and in some way, unpredictably. (Contrast with a scripted conversation, which falls outside this definition.) (However, the scope of that spontaneity may legitimately be somewhat pre-limited for the purpose of expediency, e.g. a talk show or a debate.)
Conversations are sometimes the ideal form of communication, depending on the conversants' intended ends. Conversations may be ideal when, for example, each party desires a relatively equal exchange of information, or when one party desires to question the other. (On the other hand, if permanency, or the ability to review such information is important, written communication may be ideal. Or if time-efficiency is most important, a speech may be preferable.) For a successful conversation, the partners must achieve a workable balance of contributions. A successful conversation includes mutually interesting connections between the speakers or things that the speakers know. For this to happen, those engaging in conversation must find a topic on which they both can relate in some sense.
Conversation is indispensable for the successful accomplishment of almost all activities between people, especially the coordination of work, the formation of friendship and for learning.
Conversation analysis is a branch of sociology which studies the structure and organization of human interaction, with a more specific focus on conversational interaction.

There are certain situations, typically encountered while traveling, which result in strangers sharing what ordinarily be a intimate social space such as sitting together on a bus or airplane. In such situations strangers are likely to share intimate personal information they would not ordinarily share with strangers. A special case emerges when one of the travelers is a mental health professional and the other party shares details of their personal life in the apparent hope of receiving help or advice.


Sundae is an ice cream dessert. It typically consists of a scoop of ice cream topped with sauce or syrup and, in some cases, other toppings including chopped nuts, sprinkles, whipped cream or maraschino cherries.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the origin of the term sundae is obscure. Various American localities have claimed to be the birthplace of the Ice Cream Sundae. These claimants include Ithaca, New York; Two Rivers, Wisconsin; Plainfield, Illinois; Evanston, Illinois; New York City; New Orleans, Louisiana; Cleveland, Ohio; and Buffalo, New York.
There is debate between Ithaca and Two Rivers over which city has the right to claim the title 'Birthplace of the Ice Cream Sundae'. When Ithaca mayor Carolyn K. Peterson proclaimed a day to celebrate her city as the birthplace of the sundae, she received postcards from Two Rivers' citizens reiterating that town's claim.
Of the many stories about the invention of the sundae, one frequent theme is the sinfulness of the Ice Cream Soda and the need to produce a substitute for the popular treat for consumption on Sunday. Peter Bird writes in The First Food Empire (2000) that the name 'sundae' was adopted from Illinois state's early prohibition of ice cream consumption on Sundays, because ice cream with a topping that obscured the main product was not deemed to be ice cream.

Ellen Philpotts-Page

Ellen Philpotts-Page (born February 21, 1987), known professionally as Ellen Page, is a Canadian actress. Page received both Golden Globe and Academy Award nominations for Best Actress for her role as the title character in the film Juno. She won back-to-back Austin Film Critics Association Awards for Best Actress for her roles in Juno and Hard Candy.
She is also known for her starring roles in Inception, Smart People and Whip It, and as Katherine "Kitty" Pryde in X-Men: The Last Stand. In addition, Page received attention in Canada for award-winning roles in Pit Pony and Marion Bridge, as well as television shows Trailer Park Boys and ReGenesis.
In 2008, Page was nominated for Time's 100 Most Influential People list and placed #86 on FHM's Sexiest Women in the World list, and moved up to #70 for 2010. In June 2008, Page was named on Entertainment Weekly's future A-List stars list.

Page was born and raised in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, the daughter of Martha Philpotts, a teacher, and Dennis Page, a graphic designer. She attended the Halifax Grammar School until grade 10, spent some time at Queen Elizabeth High School, and graduated from the Shambhala School in 2005. She also spent two years in Toronto, Ontario studying in the Interact Program at Vaughan Road Academy, along with close friend and fellow Canadian actor Mark Rendall. Growing up, Page enjoyed playing with action figures and climbing trees.

Sandra Annette Bullock

Sandra Annette Bullock (pronounced /ˈbʊlək/; born July 26, 1964) is an American actress and producer who rose to fame in the 1990s, after roles in successful films such as Speed and While You Were Sleeping. She has since established her career with films such as Miss Congeniality and Crash, the second of which received critical acclaim. In 2007, she was ranked as the 14th richest female celebrity with an estimated fortune of $85 million. In 2009, Bullock starred in the most financially successful films of her career, The Proposal and The Blind Side. Bullock was awarded a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress, a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role, and the Academy Award for Best Actress, for her role as Leigh Anne Tuohy in The Blind Side.
Bullock was once engaged to actor Tate Donovan, whom she met while filming Love Potion No. 9; their relationship lasted four years. She previously dated football player Troy Aikman, Austin musician Bob Schneider (for two years), and actors Matthew McConaughey and Ryan Gosling.
Bullock married motorcycle builder and Monster Garage host Jesse James on July 16, 2005. They first met when Bullock arranged for her ten-year-old godson to meet James as a Christmas present.
In November 2009, Bullock and James entered into a custody battle with James' second ex-wife, former pornographic actress Janine Lindemulder, with whom James had a child. Bullock and James subsequently won full legal custody of James' five-year-old daughter.
In March 2010, a scandal arose when several women claimed to have had affairs with James during his marriage to Bullock. Bullock cancelled European promotional appearances for The Blind Side citing "unforeseen personal reasons". On March 18, 2010, James responded to the rumors of infidelity by issuing a public apology to Bullock. He stated, "The vast majority of the allegations reported are untrue and unfounded" and "Beyond that, I will not dignify these private matters with any further public comment." James declared that "There is only one person to blame for this whole situation, and that is me", and asked that his wife and children one day "find it in their hearts to forgive me" for their current "pain and embarrassment". James’ publicist subsequently announced on March 30, 2010, that James had checked into a rehab facility "to deal with personal issues" and "save his marriage" to Bullock However on April 28, 2010, it was reported that Bullock had filed for divorce on April 23 in Austin. Their divorce was finalized on June 28, 2010, with "conflict of personalities" cited as the reason.
Bullock announced on April 28, 2010, that she had proceeded with plans to adopt a baby boy born in New Orleans.Bullock and James had begun an initial adoption process four years earlier. The child began living with them in January 2010, but they chose to keep the news private until after the Oscars in March 2010. However, given the couple's separation and then divorce, Bullock continued the adoption of the baby, named Louis Bardo Bullock, as a single parent.

1987 Hangmen Lisa Edwards
1989 Religion, Inc. (aka "A Fool and His Money") Debby
1989 Bionic Showdown: The Six Million Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman Kate Mason
1989 Who Shot Patakango? Devlin Moran
1989 The Preppie Murder Stacy
1990 Lucky/Chances Maria Santangelo
1992 Who Do I Gotta Kill? (aka "Me and the Mob") Lori
1992 When the Party's Over Amanda
1992 Love Potion No. 9 Diane Farrow
1993 The Vanishing Diane Shaver
1993 The Thing Called Love Linda Lue Linden
1993 Demolition Man Lt. Lenina Huxley Nominated—Razzie Award for Worst Supporting Actress
1993 Fire on the Amazon Alyssa Rothman
1993 Wrestling Ernest Hemingway Elaine
1994 Speed Annie Porter Saturn Award for Best Actress
MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance
MTV Movie Award for Best On-Screen Duo (with Keanu Reeves)
Nominated - MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss (with Keanu Reeves)
1995 While You Were Sleeping Lucy Moderatz Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance
1995 The Net Angela Bennett/Ruth Marx
1996 Two If by Sea Roz
1996 A Time to Kill Ellen Roark
1996 In Love and War Agnes Von Kurowsky
1997 Speed 2: Cruise Control Annie Porter Nominated—Razzie Award for Worst Actress
Nominated—Razzie Award for Worst Screen Couple (with Jason Patric)
1997 Making Sandwiches actor/writer/director/producer Debut—Sundance Film Festival
1998 Hope Floats Roberta "Birdee" Pruitt
1998 Practical Magic Sally Owens
1998 The Prince of Egypt (animated film) Miriam (Voice)
1999 Forces of Nature Sarah Lewis
2000 Gun Shy Judy Tipp
2000 28 Days Gwen Cummings
2000 Miss Congeniality Gracie Hart Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
2002 Murder by Numbers Cassie Mayweather/Jessica Marie Hudson
2002 Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood Siddalee Walker
2002 Two Weeks Notice Lucy Kelson
2004 Crash Jean Cabot Black Reel Award for Best Ensemble
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
Nominated—Gotham Awards for Best Ensemble
2005 Loverboy Mrs. Harker
2005 Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous Gracie Hart
2006 The Lake House Kate Forster
2006 Infamous Nelle Harper Lee
2007 Premonition Linda Hanson
2009 The Proposal Margaret Tate Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated—MTV Movie Award for Best Comedic Performance
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
2009 All About Steve Mary Horowitz Razzie Award for Worst Actress
Razzie Award for Worst Screen Couple (with Bradley Cooper)
2009 The Blind Side Leigh Anne Tuohy Academy Award for Best Actress
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress (tied with Meryl Streep)
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—Denver Film Critics Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Houston Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated—Washington D.C. Area Films Critics Association for Best Actress
2011 Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close filming

Carlos Irwin Estevez

Carlos Irwin Estevez (born September 3, 1965), better known by his stage name Charlie Sheen, is an American film and television actor. He is the youngest son of actor Martin Sheen.
His character roles in films have included Chris Taylor in the 1986 Vietnam War drama Platoon, Jake Kesey in the 1986 film The Wraith, and Bud Fox in the 1987 film Wall Street. His career has also included more comedic films such as Major League, the Hot Shots! films, and Scary Movie 3 and Scary Movie 4. On television, Sheen is known for his roles on two sitcoms: as Charlie Crawford on Spin City and as Charlie Harper on Two and a Half Men. In 2010, Sheen was the highest paid actor on television, earning US$1.8 million per episode of Two and a Half Men. Sheen's personal life has also made headlines, including reports about alcohol and drug abuse and marital problems as well as allegations of domestic violence. He was fired from his role on Two and a Half Men by CBS and Warner Bros. on March 7, 2011. Sheen subsequently announced a nationwide tour.
Sheen has been married three times and has five children, including one with his former high school girlfriend, Paula Profit. In 1990, Sheen accidentally shot his then fiancee, Kelly Preston, in the arm. Preston broke off the engagement soon after.
In the 1990s, Sheen dated a number of adult film actresses, including Ginger Lynn and Heather Hunter.
On September 3, 1995, Sheen married Donna Peele. That same year, Sheen was named as one of the clients of an escort agency operated by the well-known madam Heidi Fleiss.
On May 20, 1998, Sheen overdosed while using cocaine and was hospitalized. On August 11, 1998, Sheen, already on probation for a previous drug offense, had his probation extended for an extra year and entered a rehab clinic. In a 2004 interview, Sheen admitted that the overdose was caused by his experimentation with injecting cocaine.
On June 15, 2002, two years after they met on the set of the movie Good Advice, Sheen married actress Denise Richards. They have two daughters, Sam Sheen and Lola. In March 2005, Richards filed for divorce, accusing Sheen of alcohol and drug abuse and threats of violence. The divorce was finalized in November 2006 and preceded a custody dispute over their two daughters.
On May 30, 2008, Sheen married Brooke Mueller, who later gave birth to their twin sons, Bob and Max. In 2009, Sheen was arrested and released from jail after posting an $8,500 bond. Sheen was charged with felony menacing as well as third-degree assault and criminal mischief. On August 2, Sheen pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault as part of a plea bargain that included dismissal of the other charges against him. Sheen was sentenced to 30 days in a drug rehab center, 30 days of probation, and 36 hours of anger management". Sheen filed for divorce from Mueller in November 2010.
As of March 1, 2011, Sheen was concurrently living with pornographic actress Bree Olson and model and graphic designer Natalie Kenly, whom he collectively nicknamed his "goddesses". Also as of March 1, police had removed Bob and Max from Sheen's home. Sheen told NBC's Today, "I stayed very calm and focused." This move came after, according to People, Mueller had obtained a restraining order. The document said, "I am very concerned that [Sheen] is currently insane." Asked if he would fight for the children, Sheen texted People, "Born ready. Winning."

1974 The Execution of Private Slovik Kid at Wedding NBC TV-movie; uncredited part.
1979 Apocalypse Now Extra
1984 Red Dawn Matt Eckert
Silence of the Heart Ken Cruze CBS TV-movie
1985 The Fourth Wise Man Captain (Herod's Soldiers) TV-movie
Out of the Darkness Man Shaving CBS TV-movie
The Boys Next Door Bo Richards
1986 Lucas Cappie
Ferris Bueller's Day Off Garth Volbeck-Boy in Police Station Cameo
Platoon Private Chris Taylor
The Wraith Jake Kesey
Wisdom Hamburger Restaurant Manager Cameo
1987 Wall Street Bud Fox
No Man's Land Ted Varrick
Three for the Road Paul
Grizzly II: The Predator Concert Ron Unreleased
filmed in 1983
1988 Never on Tuesday Thief Uncredited Cameo
Eight Men Out Oscar 'Happy' Felsch
Young Guns Richard "Dick" Brewer Bronze Wrangler Award
1989 Tale of Two Sisters Narrator also writer (poems)
Major League Ricky 'Wild Thing' Vaughn
Catchfire Bob Cameo
1990 Cadence Pfc. Franklin Fairchild Bean
Courage Mountain Peter
Men at Work Carl Taylor
Navy SEALs Lt. (j.g.) Dale Hawkins
The Rookie David Ackerman
1991 Hot Shots! Lt. Sean Topper Harley
1992 Beyond the Law William Patrick Steaner/Daniel "Dan" Saxon/Sid
Oliver Stone: Inside Out Himself Documentary
1993 National Lampoon's Loaded Weapon 1 Gern, Parking Valet Cameo
Deadfall Morgan "Fats" Gripp Cameo
Hot Shots! Part Deux Lt. Sean Topper Harley
The Three Musketeers Aramis
1994 Charlie Sheen's Stunt Spectacular Himself TV-movie
Terminal Velocity Richard 'Ditch' Brodie
The Chase Jackson Davis "Jack" Hammond also executive producer
Major League II Ricky 'Wild Thing' Vaughn
1996 Loose Women Barbie Loving Bartender Cameo appearance
Frame by Frame
All Dogs Go to Heaven 2 Charles B. "Charlie" Barkin (only voice)
The Arrival Zane Zaminsky
1997 Money Talks James Russell
Shadow Conspiracy Bobby Bishop
Bad Day on the Block Lyle Wilder also known as Under Pressure
1998 Postmortem James McGregor
A Letter from Death Row Cop #1 Cameo
No Code of Conduct Jacob "Jake" Peterson also executive producer and writer
Free Money Bud Dyerson
Junket Whore Himself Documentary
1999 Lisa Picard is Famous Himself
Five Aces Chris Martin
Being John Malkovich Himself Nominated – Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
Nominated – Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast
2000 Rated X Artie Jay "Art" Mitchell Showtime TV-movie
2001 Good Advice Ryan Edward Turner
Last Party 2000 Himself Documentary, uncredited
2002 The Making of Bret Michaels Himself Documentary
2003 Scary Movie 3 Tom Logan
2004 The Big Bounce Bob Rogers Jr.
Pauly Shore Is Dead Himself Cameo
2005 Guilty Hearts Charlie Sheen segment "Spelling Bee"
2006 Scary Movie 4 Tom Logan Uncredited Cameo
2010 Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps Bud Fox Uncredited Cameo
Due Date Himself/Charlie Harper Cameo

Emily Deschanel

Emily Erin Deschanel ( /deɪʃəˈnɛl/; born October 11, 1976) is an American actress and television producer who plays Dr. Temperance "Bones" Brennan in the comedy-crime drama, Bones.
Deschanel is a vegan and a committed supporter of animal rights causes. She can be seen in an Access Hollywood video at the book launch event of Karen Dawn's Thanking the Monkey: Rethinking the Way We Treat Animals, discussing how vegetarian and vegan diets help the environment, and a video on the homepage of the book's website talking about the importance of animal rights. She graduated from Boston University's Professional Actors Training Program with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theater.
Deschanel married writer-actor David Hornsby on September 25, 2010 during a small private ceremony in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. On March 31, 2011 the couple announced that they were expecting their first child together later this year.

1994 It Could Happen to You Paint Throwing Fur Activist
2000 It's a Shame About Ray Maggie Short film
2001 The Heart Department Maude Allyn TV movie
2002 Rose Red Pam Asbury TV miniseries
2002 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Cassie Germaine Episode: "Surveillance"
2002 Providence Annie Franks Episode: "Cloak & Dagger"
Episode: "The Eleventh Hour"
2003 The Dan Show Sam TV movie
2003 Easy Laura Harris Independent Film
2003 Cold Mountain Mrs. Morgan
2004 The Alamo Rosanna Travis
2004 Crossing Jordan Michelle Episode: "All the News Fit to Print"
2004 Spider-Man 2 Receptionist
2004 Old Tricks Woman Short film
2005 Boogeyman Kate Houghton
2005 Mute Claire Short film
2005 That Night Annie Short film
2005–present Bones Dr. Temperance Brennan Main Role
2006 Glory Road Mary Haskins
2009 My Sister's Keeper Dr. Farquad
2009 Tit for Tat Emily TV series
2010 The Cleveland Show Julia Roberts (voice) Episode: "Cleveland Live!"
2012 The Perfect Family Shannon Cleary Post-production

Liv Tyler

Liv Rundgren Tyler (born July 1, 1977) is an American actress and model. She is the daughter of Aerosmith's lead singer, Steven Tyler, and Bebe Buell, model and singer. Tyler began a career in modeling at the age of 14, but after less than a year she decided to focus on acting. She made her film debut in the 1994 film Silent Fall. She then appeared in supporting roles in Empire Records (1995), Heavy (1996) and That Thing You Do! (1996). Tyler later achieved critical recognition in the leading role Stealing Beauty (1996). She followed this by starring in supporting roles including Inventing the Abbotts (1997) and Cookie's Fortune (1999).
Tyler achieved international recognition as a result of her portrayal of Elf maiden Arwen Undómiel in the Lord of the Rings film trilogy. She has appeared in an eclectic range of films, including the 2004 comedy Jersey Girl, the indie film Lonesome Jim (2005), the drama Reign Over Me (2007) and big-budget studio films such as Armageddon (1998), The Strangers (2008) and The Incredible Hulk (2008).
Since 2003, Tyler has served as a United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Goodwill Ambassador for the United States, and as a spokesperson for Givenchy's line of perfume and cosmetics.
Tyler was born Liv Rundgren at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. She is the first-born daughter of Bebe Buell, a model, singer, and former Playboy Playmate (Miss November 1974), and Steven Tyler, the lead singer of Aerosmith. Her mother named her after Norwegian actress Liv Ullmann, after seeing Ullmann on the cover of the March 5, 1977 issue of TV Guide. She is of Italian, German, Polish, Russian and English ancestry on her father's side and also has three half-siblings: Mia Tyler (born 1978), Chelsea Anna Tallarico (born 1989), and Taj Monroe Tallarico (born 1992). Her maternal grandmother, Dorothea Johnson, founded the Protocol School of Washington.
In 1998, Tyler began dating British musician Royston Langdon of the band Spacehog.[1] She and Langdon became engaged in February 2001, and married in Barbados on March 25, 2003.On December 14, 2004, she gave birth to a son, Milo William Langdon. On May 8, 2008, the couple confirmed through representatives that they would be separating but remain friends. In an interview with the Australian Daily Telegraph, Tyler revealed that her separation from Langdon led her to move to Los Angeles, explaining that it was hard to be in the New York home they shared. In June 2010, Tyler stated she was "far too sensitive" for casual dates, adding "I fall in love once in a blue moon."
Tyler is an active supporter of the charitable United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). She was appointed as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United States in 2003. In November 2004, she hosted the lighting of the UNICEF Snowflake in New York City Tyler also served as spokesperson for the 2004 Givenchy Mother's Day promotion, in support of UNICEF's Maternal & Neonatal Tetanus (MNT) campaign.

1994 Silent Fall Sylvie Warden
1995 Heavy Callie
Empire Records Corey Mason
1996 Stealing Beauty Lucy Harmon Nominated – Young Star Award for Best Performance by a Young Actress in a Drama Film
That Thing You Do! Faye Dolan
1997 Inventing the Abbotts Pamela Abbott
U Turn Girl in Bus Station Cameo appearance
1998 Armageddon Grace Stamper Nominated – MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance
Nominated – MTV Movie Award for Best On-Screen Duo Shared with Ben Affleck
Nominated – Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Actress -Science Fiction
1999 Plunkett & Macleane Lady Rebecca Gibson
Cookie's Fortune Emma Duvall
Onegin Tatyana Larina Russian Guild of Film Critics Award for Best Foreign Actress
2000 Dr. T & the Women Marilyn
2001 One Night at McCool's Jewel
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Arwen Undómiel Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast
Nominated – Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast
2002 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Arwen Undómiel Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Ensemble
Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast
Nominated – Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast
2003 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Arwen Undómiel Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast
National Board of Review Award for Best Cast
Nominated – Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Ensemble
2004 Jersey Girl Maya
2005 Lonesome Jim Anika
2007 Reign Over Me Dr. Angela Oakhurst
2008 The Strangers Kristen McKay Scream Awards for Best Horror Actress
Nominated – Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress: Horror/Thriller
The Incredible Hulk Betty Ross
Smother Clare Cooper
2011 Super Sarah
The Ledge Shana post-production

Los Angeles Dodgers

The Los Angeles Dodgers are a professional baseball team based in Los Angeles, California. The Dodgers are members of Major League Baseball's National League West Division. Established in 1883, the team originated in Brooklyn, New York, where it was known by a number of nicknames before becoming the Dodgers definitively by 1932.The team moved to Los Angeles before the 1958 season. They played their first four seasons in Los Angeles at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum before moving to their current home of Dodger Stadium, the third-oldest ballpark in Major League Baseball.
In the modern (post-1903) era, the team, then known as the Robins, won league pennants in 1916 and 1920, losing the World Series both times, first to Boston and then Cleveland. In 1941, as the Dodgers, they captured their third National League pennant, only to lose again to the New York Yankees. This marked the onset of the Yankees–Dodgers rivalry, as the Dodgers would face them in their next six World Series appearances. Led by Jackie Robinson, the first black Major League Baseball player of the modern era, and three-time National League Most Valuable Player Roy Campanella, also signed out of the Negro Leagues, the Dodgers captured their first World Series title in 1955 by defeating the Yankees for the first time.
Following the 1957 season, the team left Brooklyn. In just their second season in Los Angeles, the Dodgers won their second World Series title, beating the Chicago White Sox in six games in 1959. Spearheaded by the dominant pitching style of Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale, the Dodgers captured three pennants in the 1960s and won two more World Series titles in 1963, sweeping the Yankees in four games, and 1965, edging the Minnesota Twins in seven. The 1963 sweep represented their second victory against the Yankees and first against them as a Los Angeles team. The Dodgers won three more pennants in 1974, 1977 and 1978, but lost in each World Series appearance. They went on to win the World Series again in 1981, thanks to pitching sensation Fernando Valenzuela. The early 1980s were affectionately dubbed "Fernandomania." In 1988, another pitching hero, Orel Hershiser, again led them to a World Series victory, aided by one of the most memorable home runs of all time, by their injured star outfielder Kirk Gibson coming off the bench to pinch hit with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning of game 1, in his only appearance of the series.
The Dodgers share a fierce rivalry with the San Francisco Giants, it being the oldest rivalry in baseball dating back to when the two franchises played in New York City. Both teams moved west for the 1958 season. The Dodgers and Giants are tied for the most National League pennants (21), the second most World Series appearances (18), and the number of World Series titles won (6). Although the two franchises have enjoyed near equal success, the city rivalries are rather lopsided and in both cases, a teams championships have predated to the other's only one in that particular location. When the two teams were based in New York, the Giants won five World Series championships, and the Dodgers 1. After the move to California, it has been the reverse—the Dodgers have won five in Los Angeles, the Giants won one in San Francisco.
By 1890 New Yorkers (Brooklyn was a separate city until it became a borough in 1898) routinely called anyone from Brooklyn a "trolley dodger," due to the vast network of street car lines criss-crossing the borough as people dodged trains to play on the streets. When the second Washington Park burned down early in the 1891 season, the team moved to nearby Eastern Park, which was bordered on two sides by street car tracks. That's when the team was first called the Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers. That was soon shortened to Dodgers.Possibly because of the "street character" nature of Jack Dawkins, the "Artful Dodger" in Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist, sportswriters in the early 20th Century began referring to the Dodgers as the "Bums."
Other team names used by the franchise which would finally be called the Dodgers were the Atlantics, Grays, Grooms, the Bridegrooms, the Superbas and the Robins. All of these nicknames were used by fans and sportswriters to describe the team, but not in any official capacity. The team's legal name was the Brooklyn Base Ball Club.However, the Trolley Dodger nickname was used throughout this period, simultaneously with these other nicknames, by fans and sportswriters of the day. The team did not use the name in any formal sense until 1932, when the word "Dodgers" appeared on jerseys for the team. The "conclusive shift" came in 1933, when both home and road jerseys for the team bore the name "Dodgers".
Examples of how the many popularized names of the team were used are available from newspaper articles from the period before 1932. A New York Times article describing a game the Dodgers played in 1916 starts out by referring to how "Jimmy Callahan, pilot of the Pirates, did his best to wreck the hopes the Dodgers have of gaining the National League pennant", but then goes on to comment "the only thing that saved the Superbas from being toppled from first place was that the Phillies lost one of the two games played". What is interesting about the use of these two nicknames is that most baseball statistics sites and baseball historians generally now refer to the pennant-winning 1916 Brooklyn team as the Robins. A 1918 New York Times article does use the nickname Robins in its title "Buccaneers Take Last From Robins", but the subtitle of the article reads "Subdue The Superbas By 11 To 4, Making Series An Even Break".
Another example of the fluidity of use of the different nicknames is found on the program issued at Ebbetts Field for the 1920 World Series, which identifies the matchup in the series as "Dodgers vs. Indians", despite the fact that the Robins nickname had been in consistent usage at this point for around six years.